Tag Archives: Maddie Hinch

Fans get a taste of this summer’s hockeyfest at Jaffa Super 6s Finals

It’s shaping up to be a big summer for hockey in London.

This year’s Eurohockey Club Cup for women is being held in May at Surbiton. One month later, the Women’s World Cup is being stage at Lee Valley, the location for the London 2012 Olympic hockey tournament.

Hopes will be high among British fans that Team GB can add World Cup success to the 2014 Olympic gold in Rio.

But ahead of those two major tournaments came the Jaffa Super 6 Finals at the Copper Box Arena, a 7,500-seat indoor venue also built for the 2012 Games in Stratford.

Outdoor hockey is still on its winter break, but that doesn’t mean that the players are doing nothing.

The Jaffa Super 6s is an indoor hockey league for men and women’s teams. Each side has six players, and a game comprises of two 20-minute halves

The women’s final was between Bowton Hightown and Leicester, with the men’s showdown featuring East Grinstead and Team Bath Buccaneers.

Tickets were available for around £30, which seemed pretty pricey, but the doors opened at 9:45am and there were six games played during the day, so a fiver per match was reasonable.

The atmosphere

My first impression upon walking into the Copper Box was how quiet it was. The arena was only half full and the fans were not cheering and shouting. Only when the announcer motivated the spectators did the volume start rising.

The crowd was a mix of schoolgirls, parents with young children and, noticeably, quite a few groups of middle-aged men. Hockey is generally perceived as a female sport so it was surprising to see groups of guys in the crowd.

The players from the eight teams competing that day were casually walking around the arena, talking to family or friends.

The games

I only went for the two finals of the day and was a bit disappointed by the quality of the hockey on display.

First, the ladies final started slowly and the pave of play was not like normal indoor hockey games, with goals galore and plenty of penalty corners.

The ladies final ended in a 2-1 victory for Bowton Hightown; the scoreline tells you it wasn’t much of a spectacle.

However, thanks to their win, Bowton qualified for next season’s European indoor competition.

The men’s final was more exciting, with East Grinstead running out 4-2 winners.

The overall experience

One thing that really stood out was the sheer enthusiasm of the red-shirted volunteers. There were lots of them and they all knew what to do, creating a feeling that the event was very well organised.

They were all very excited and helpful. During the games some of them sat in the stands to watch, and it was good to see hockey lovers helping out at an event like this.

The volunteers were also advertising to sign up as a volunteer for the upcoming tournaments this summer.

But the best thing about the whole day was that there were players such Kate Richardson-Walsh, Helen Richardson-Walsh, Sam Quek and others from Team GB’s Olympic team in action.

Team GB goalkeeper Maddie Hinch was having her photo taken with kids next to the World Cup trophy. Nowadays you almost can’t imagine a sport where players who won Olympic gold can just walk around and are up for a chat, with no paparazzi or security.

They were just being ambassadors for their sport. It’s an easy way to get people interested in hockey, and so many boys and girls can now say they met their idols.

Let’s be honest, hockey is a minority sport and, and indoor hockey is even less popular. But there are so many good sides to it. Having a relaxed day out with the family. Seeing your favourite players for only £30, and you can even get to talk to them.

The Jaffa Super 6s was the perfect PR event to promote the EHCC and the World Cup. I think more people got excited for this summer.

Although the quality of the games were not that high, some of the best hockey players in the world were there, and it was a nice day out.

‘We had this look in our eyes like this is our day’

“You’ve got to believe in yourself because if you don’t believe it’s going to happen and you don’t make it happen, it won’t.”

Nicola White is recalling the advice her mother gave her long before she won women’s hockey Olympic gold in Rio de Janiero.

White lives by those words and is honest when discussing the turnaround that led her from failing to make her first England trials at the age of 15 to becoming Great Britain’s hero as her late equaliser to make it 3-3 in the final against reigning Olympic champions the Netherlands forced the game to a shootout decider.

White and the GB hockey squad ensured hockey became compelling viewing in Rio. When it comes to discussing the team’s journey from London in 2012 to Brazil four years later, White’s steely undercurrent and strong motivation becomes apparent.

“My journey wasn’t particularly perfect,” she admits. “I had my first England trials when I was 15 and I didn’t make it. I didn’t get my second England trials until I was 19 and I was quite a latecomer really because under 16’s and under 18’s is crucial for the development. To come in at under 21 level fairly late, I was really lucky.

“One of the things that we worked really hard since London was our culture. There’s 31 of us that train and it was sometimes hard to agree on something and get the best out of ourselves, but we improved our values and we embraced it.”

Competition 

Her and the team’s success is a result of perseverance and dedication but it is also a tale of competition. “Everyone in the squad had a responsibility to do their best,” she says.

“We wanted to make a difference and it created this massive bond of trust within the team. I think one of the most amazing things was stepping onto the pitch having built this culture. The competition for places was so high and we used to play high-paced games on a Thursday within the squad.

“The coaches would send out the game plan on a Wednesday night so we knew what we had to bring and what we had to do.

“Everyone brought their best games, and it ensured this amazing standard of hockey and brought out the best in us all.

“These little things impact hugely because when you get into an Olympic final, the pressure is massive but you know how to deal with it.”

Golden moment 

White is still overwhelmed by the team’s stunning success this summer. When it came to Rio and taking on the Netherlands, who were vying for a third Olympic gold in a row and huge favourites, there was a determination among the GB players.

The game was drifting away at one point, but Britain’s never-say-die attitude led by an indomitable White performance, paid off when she made it 3-3 in the final period.

Goalkeeper Maddie Hinch then pulled off some stunning saves in the shootout as the GB girls achieved history.

White remains refreshingly low-key about her golden moment. 

The forward says: “I knew we had eight minutes to go and we were losing against the reigning champions of the world.

“Holland are historically a really good team and I was so glad we played them because they were the elephant [in the room] and people thought we couldn’t beat them when it came to the crunch.

“All I remember is we had a short corner and I was just on red alert, and I’ve never been on red alert like that before and I thought if we can get this level, I knew we would hold on and it would go to penalties.

“The ball just fell and I put it towards the goal and I thought nothing else of it. Everyone’s faces were the same as we had this look in our eyes like this is our day. We just had this confidence about us.”

Overwhelming 

Looking back on the summer heroics, White admits the feeling of winning an Olympic gold medal has only just recently sunk in.

“It’s a real cliche, but it’s pretty much a dream come true for me and my team-mates. I’ve started to come back down to earth now but at the time it was just so overwhelming.

“I had so many emotions going through my head when we actually won it. It was just sort of flicking from happiness and emotion and I had happy tears, but it was an amazing experience.

“The girls who took the penalties were confident and I knew that if we stuck to what we did, we would win.

“We all knew, as much as we were nervous at the time, that if anyone was going to win it, it would be us. We are so used to that feeling of being under pressure in penalties that we thrived on it.”

Support

The support of her family has been key for White, particularly in picking her up from that England trials rejection aged 15.

“My mum has supported me massively on my journey. I remember she used to tell me a lot when I was young that you’ve got to believe in yourself because if you don’t believe it’s going to happen and you don’t make it happen, it won’t.

“That’s probably what’s stuck with me the most. Her telling me that if I keep working and don’t give up in the first hurdle, it’ll all pay off, and she was right.”

Spotlight

With success comes greater attention, and White agrees that more interest from the media and general public in hockey can only be a positive thing for her sport.

“We have gained lots of media attention as a team,” she says. “That’s really good for our sport, and I think the biggest thing is how much the sport has grown.

“I guess the legacy started at London 2012, when we won bronze, and has grown since our gold medal.

“When we go around the country, people tell us how they didn’t watch hockey before but now they love it.

“People have warmed to us and that’s probably the biggest change because people are now talking about it.

“When I say ‘I’m Nicola White, I’m one of the hockey girls’, they’re like ‘we love you’! Previously they would have been confused as many people didn’t know about us, so it’s nice to now hear them say that.”

Mindset

As a seven-year-old in Shaw and Crompton, Greater Manchester, White dreamt of being a hockey player.

White and the rest of the GB women’s hockey team

“I was lucky that my school played hockey because a lot of schools didn’t,” she explains. “I was lucky to get involved with it at such a young age, and that my teacher was involved in the pathway to internationals.

“She was in the county and regional set-ups, had the best hockey knowledge and knew where to go and how to make it happen. She guided and started me off.

“Skills-wise you’ve got to have a certain talent to be good at any sport. What I’ve realised on my journey is that your mindset is just as important.

“It’s all good and well having the talent but you’ve got to apply yourself. Every day you have to wake up and want to give it your all, and it’s that commitment, that desire and hunger that’s needed to be successful.”

Women in sport 

As a youngster, the GB hockey star idolised female athletes such as Kelly Holmes and Tina Cullen, and says she has seen progress in the amount of media attention women in sport receive.

“I think there’s more of an acceptance that women are successful and need to be given as much credit as the men get, and it’s a major thing that’s been highlighted probably in the last decade.

“Women haven’t had as much recognition as they should have had. People are pushing for more equality. Tennis now offers the same wages for men and women, and things are becoming more equal.

“That should be the norm and moving forward, I think it will be. It’s being driven by the successes we have had in football, hockey, rugby union and other sports.

“I love it and I’m so proud because that’s all we ever wanted. We just want people to accept us for what we’ve done and give us the recognition.”

Tokyo 2020 

White regularly refers to her competitiveness in her downtime when playing other sports like tennis and golf with her two brothers, but the main objective is to get prepared for another four years of gruelling build-up to the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.

Preparation is well underway, and White says it will be harder to stay at the top of the tree in 2020 because everyone will be aiming to knock GB off their perch.

“We have to not just be happy with the gold we won, but say to ourselves that we can win it again”

“It sounds so scary thinking about how we will be back in four years time,” she says. “No doubt we will be looking for a gold medal because you cannot go from this success to not target another gold medal.

“I remember our coach Danny Kerry, after the Olympics we sat in a room in Rio and he was talking about success on success and how much of a difficult challenge it is and that’s what we are accepting.

‘As much as the journey is hard to get to the top, it is much harder to stay there. You’re now at the top and everyone’s chasing you, so it’ll be about rebuilding the culture, replacing the players who have retired with new players.

“There’s nothing holding us back now so we have to relish it. We have to use it and not just be happy with the gold we won, but say to ourselves that we can win it again. That’ll be the challenge but we are aiming to go for it again.”

You can follow Nicola White on Twitter @NicolaWhite28 and on Facebook @NicolaWhiteGB28